Digital Media Projects

Over seventy students recently completed the year-long CT231 module in Professional Skills. For their final Digital Media Projects, students were asked to develop a resource for an audience beyond their own class and university, choosing whatever form of digital media they wished — blog, video, audio, app, etc. The range of topics was impressive — spanning music, dance, sport and fitness, Irish history and legend, education, gaming, social media, computers, computer science and information technology. Students also were asked to publish their projects openly online, using only their own work or openly-licensed content, and to make their work available with a Creative Commons license. Students shared their work via social media using #ct231, our course hashtag, as well as #icollab, the hashtag shared by the 7 student cohorts (from Galway to Auckland, NZ) who share their work in the iCollab community of practice.

All of the projects were interesting — a few which attracted particular attention in the form of comments, shares and retweets were:

Please check out the work produced by CT231 students below. Your feedback would be much appreciated!

Social Media, Games & Digital Literacy

Console Wars: PS4 vs. Xbox [blog] – Cathal Kelly

Mything the Point – hoax busting [blog] – Ross Clifford, Adam Long, Christopher Ward

Effects of social media on young people [blog] – Shane Martino Daly, Andrew McGinley

How news spreads fast through social media [blog] – Ronan Carr, Mark Nallen, Anthony Ruffley

Unholy Trinity Productions: What’s going on in Crimea? [web comic] – Conor McDonnell, Darren Dennehy, David Smyth

Car Content audio podcasts: next generation technology – Ryan Hehir, Thomas Keane

Computers, Computer Science & Information Technology

Turn an old PC into a LAMP server [blog] – Gareth Jennings

Mass Mural: collaborative drawing app [drawing application] – Adrian Cooney

Replace the LCD panel in a laptop – David Renton, Evan Preisler

How to build your own PC [blog] – Matthew Fox, Cathal Hardiman

Smart homes and smartgrid [blog] – David Heffernan, Shane Sheridan

Procedural tree generation & animation – Alex Lorenz

Music

Guitar modding & customisation [blog] – Dylan Toner

Guitar tutorial – Aaron Kelly

Learn piano basics [blog] – Daniel Marcelo

Find the chords of any song [blog with videos] – Sean McLoughlin, Christopher Eluvathingal

Piano lesson – Brian Carroll

Music technology today [blog] – Martin Donnellan, Matthew Flanagan

Ireland, Galway & Student Life

Irish History, Myth & Legend [interactive map] – Jerry Lehane

GalwayDays – Galway events, interests, shopping, eating [blog] – Monika Penkova

Dansoc – NUI Galway [blog] – Claire Sheridan

Jogging routes around Galway – Shane Curtin

Having an enjoyable college experience – Darren Higgins, Sean Hughes, Michael Losty

TV & movie reviews [blog] – Michael Dowling, Kevin O’Sullivan, Kyle Lynch-Kurzawa

Real dinners – on a student budget [blog] – Enda McDaid

Learning & Education

Encouraging girls involvement in IT [blog] – Ailbhe Leahy

ICT in primary school education [blog] – Greg Hanley, Mosi Ruane

Tutorial testout – testing various web tutorials [blog] – Luke Finnerty

Video lectures – a trial – Nils Blosenko, Thomas McGarry

Health, Fitness & Sport

Computer injuries help [blog] – Lydia Shirly, Matthew Hallinan, Alex McElhinney

Few Pints, Be Grand? – dangers of excessive drinking [blog] – Patrick Gallagher

Exercise and fitness [videos] – Aaron McGloin, Nigel McIntyre

4 sports [blog] – Seán Collum, Niall Martin, Breandán ÓConghaile, Shane O’Rourke

IT and food safety, production & delivery [blog] – Andy Yuan, Xingtian Du

The Future

Motoring into the Future [blog] – Anthony Jackson

 

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Google image search: filter by usage rights

It’s great to see that Google is making it simpler to search images by usage rights. In addition to searching for open access and Creative Commons-licensed images on Flickr, you can now do this easily on Google. When searching for an image on Google, just click the ‘Search tools’ option, then select an option under ‘Usage Rights’. This may be useful for finding images for your blog posts and digital media projects.

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Cooperation, Collaboration & Creative Commons

In the past two weeks, we’ve explored cooperation and collaboration, as well as copyright and Creative Commons.

Cooperation & Collaboration

There is a growing body of work and literature around cooperation and collaboration, and the distinction between them. Both are important concepts to grasp as programmers, creators and networked individuals. In essence, collaboration (co-labor) means individuals acting together towards a common goal; cooperation (co-operate) means individuals sharing with one another, without any direct benefit. Collaboration happens in groups; cooperation happens in networks.

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CC BY-NC-SA Harold Jarche

Both collaboration and cooperation are essential for creativity and effective problem-solving. We need effective teamwork skills in order to collaborate in groups, and we need network literacies and Personal Learning Networks in order to work cooperatively in networks. In this module, we are developing literacies in both areas through our participation in the #icollab community of practice.

See readings by Howard Rheingold and Howard Jarche in our course reading list (link above right) to explore these topics further.

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CC BY-NC-SA Harold Jarche

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Copyright & Creative Commons

If you create and/or share information online, it is important to have an understanding of both copyright and Creative Commons. You retain the copyright (an exclusive legal right) to everything you create — a photograph, video, music, blog post or software program. However, by assigning a Creative Commons license, you can determine the rights by which your work can be shared, used and remixed. Whether you create your own work to share online, or share information created by others, the following resources will help you to do so with greater awareness. These two short Creative Commons (CC) videos are a good place to start:

Creative Commons License A Shared Culture by Jesse Dylan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike (CC BY-NC-SA) license.

Creative Commons License What is Creative Commons? Wanna Work Together RG Remix by MasterNewMedia.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike (CC BY-NC-SA) license.

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If you need an image to illustrate a blog post, for example, you’ll need to search for Creative Commons-licensed or open access images. This requires a bit more work than simply searching in Google images, but it is essential in order not to violate copyright. Fortunately, there are some great tools which help you to find Creative Commons-licensed images and other materials. Here are a few:

  • Compfight – excellent search tool for Creative Commons-licensed Flickr images
  • CC Search – powerful search across a variety of platforms (e.g. Flickr, Google images, YouTube) to help you find content you can share, use, remix
  • Flickr images – enter search term, click Advanced Search, then tick the box “only search within Creative Commons-licensed content”
  • Flickr CC bluemountains – search for CC images on Flickr, returns images and CC license information
  • Content Directories – extensive list of directories of Creative Commons-licensed materials (audio, video, image, text)
  • Creative Commons Wiki – a Creative Commons image directory

Finally, you can keep up-to-date by following @creativecommons on Twitter and keeping an eye on the Creative Commons blog. Please share any additional resources on Creative Commons resources on Twitter, using the #ct231 hashtag.